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Non-Invasive Cardiology

Non-Invasive Cardiology performs non-invasive testing for outpatient and admitted patients, utilizing the latest technology to diagnose cardiac disease. The Sands-Constellation Heart Institute’s Non-Invasive Cardiology Lab is proud to be accredited by the Intersocietal Commission for the Accreditation of Echocardiology Laboratories for the provision of high quality echocardiograms and patient care.

Non-invasive cardiologyThe Non-Invasive Cardiology Department is staffed with a multidisciplinary group of professionals. They include: (Physicians (Cardiologists), Registered Nurses (RNs), Cardiology Sonographers (Echo Technologists), Special Procedures Technicians and EKG Technicians.)

Non-Invasive procedures performed:

  • Transthoracic Echocardiography (TTE) – A transducer (a small device that produces harmless sound waves) is placed on your chest, and the sound waves bounce (echo) off your heart, creating images of your heart in motion as it pumps blood through the valves and chambers, on a video screen. These images help your doctor identify and treat problems such as infection, disease, or defects in your heart’s walls or valves. No preparation is required for the test. The test takes approximately 45 minutes.

     
  • Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE) – The images produced are similar to that of Transthoracic Echocardiography, with the exception that the recorded images of your heart are taken from inside your esophagus (or food pipe). Since the esophagus lies just behind the heart, TEE may produce clearer pictures of the heart’s movement than would standard (Transthoracic) echocardiography taken from outside the chest. Again, these images help your doctor identify and treat problems such as infection, disease, or defects in your heart’s walls or valves. Preparation – Since the cardiologist places the transducer in your esophagus, you will need to fast for 6 hours before the test. You will be given a mild sedation during the test, therefore you will need someone to drive you home. The test takes approximately 45 minutes

     
  • Stress Echocardiography – A transducer is placed on your chest and images are obtained (as with TTE) both before and immediately following exercise. The doctor compares the two images to detect any changes in the way your heart responds when exerted.

    For the stress test, your blood pressure will be monitored and the nurse will apply electrodes to your chest to monitor your electrocardiogram (EKG) before, during and after exercise. You will be asked to walk on a treadmill until your heart is beating rapidly. If you have a medical condition that prevents you from exercising, your heart rate may be increased by using an intervenous medication (Dobutamine). Your doctor will then compare your EKG before, during and after exercise, with the echo images obtained.

    No preparation is required for the test unless the use of Dobutamine is expected, then you must fast for 4 hour before to test. The test takes approximately 45 minutes to one hour.
     
     
  • Stress Test (Exercise Tolerance Test) (ETT) – A test to see how your electrocardiogram (EKG) responds when exerted. Your blood pressure will be monitored and the nurse will apply electrodes to your chest to monitor your electrocardiogram (EKG) before, during and after exercise. You will be asked to walk on a treadmill until your heart is beating rapidly. Your doctor will then compare your EKG before, during and after exercise for any changes. No preparation required. The test takes approximately 30 minutes.

     
  • Tilt Table Test – A test to see how your body responds to a changes in position for people who have had recurrent syncope (fainting spells). During the test, you lie on a table that can be moved to a nearly upright position while your symptoms, heart rate and blood pressure are continuously monitored for changes. Preparation - you will need to fast 6 hours before test. The test takes approximately 45 minutes to one hour.
     
     
  • Holter Monitoring (24 Hours Avionics) – A continuous recording of your heart rhythm, usually for 24 hours, as you go about your daily activities. This is used to diagnose abnormal heart rhythms that may come and go during the day. No preparation required.

     
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) – A recording of the heart’s electrical activity recorded on a moving paper. No preparation required.

Location

Located on the Lobby level near Red elevators and atrium at Rochester General Hospital.


Administrative Staff

  • Maurice Vaughan, MD Medical Director
  • Darryl L. Pike RT (R), CVT  Department Manager
     

For more information, contact The Sands-Constellation Heart Institute at (585) 922-4261.